American Missionary With Ebola Arrives in Atlanta, Nancy Writebol to Return Soon

CHARLOTTE, N.C., |Christian News Service| – Nancy Writebol, the American missionary who contracted David and Nancy WritebolEbola while serving in Liberia, will return to the U.S. for further treatment in a few days, according to SIM (www.simusa.org), the Christian mission organization with which she serves.  She remains in serious, but stable condition.

Writebol was serving on a joint team with Dr. Kent Brantly of Samaritan’s Purse, an international relief organization, when they both contracted the virus.

The same medical evacuation plane that brought Brantly back to the U.S. for treatment will return to Liberia and pick up Writebol. The plane, which is equipped with a unique containment unit, will fly into Dobbins Air Force Base in Atlanta. Writebol will then be transported to Emory University Hospital and placed in a special isolation unit set up in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control.  

“We remain encouraged by Nancy’s condition, and we can’t wait to have her back home,” said Bruce Johnson, president of SIM USA. “We are grateful for the help and support of the U.S. State Department, the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization and Emory Hospital.  We are also extremely grateful for the prayers of people around the world.” 

Writebol’s husband, David, will travel back to the U.S. separately in a few days. He will stay in the Atlanta area to be near his wife.

SIM nonessential personnel also will return to the U.S. in the next several days. Travel plans are incomplete at this time.

SIM is following strict personal and public health safety protocols established by the CDC and World Health Organization in these efforts.  To date, no other SIM staff members are ill or showing symptoms of infection.  Their health is being monitored continually.

Although nonessential SIM personnel are leaving the country, SIM is sending another American doctor to help with the treatment of Ebola patients at its ELWA treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. SIM currently has two doctors on site that have been caring for Writebol, Brantly and others.  Other SIM ministries, including its radio station, school and HIV-AIDS public health education group, continue to operate with Liberian staff.

The latest updates on Writebol’s condition and SIM’s role in the Ebola epidemic in Liberia are available at www.simusa.org.